Here I am playing catch up again! I finally have a break in my freelance work so I can get caught up on my blog posts.  Writing this blog brings clearly to light the passing of time.  In a blink weeks can go by, my children grow and seasons change.  I wrote this post for one of my Heinens grocery store recipes that they feature weekly.  I realized that I hadn’t shared it here. You will want in your collection, so here you go.  Originally this was an idea for a Valentine’s Day recipe. I will be making a similiar meal for Easter this weekend.  This time with crabcakes instead of scallops.  I promise to post my crab cake recipe soon. You will need that one!  It’s a family favorite!

Heinen’s had asked me for a surf and turf post.  Traditional surf and turf is a meal combining steak or red meat and seafood. Typically, I’ve prepared this as a steamed lobster tail with some cut of steak, usually a filet. Thinking outside the box to create a “non-traditional” surf and turf I came up with many ideas; A salad with octopus and chorizo sausage, perhaps.  Lobster ravioli with veal medallions might work. How about crab cakes and beef tenderloin?  All sound good but the reality is that Valentine’s Day and my husband’s birthday are in the same week so consequently,  I  prepared some of HIS favorites in a new way. 

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This has been a crazy week patched together by time spent in Chicago, Washington D.C. and St  Louis. On our last night in D.C. we took Paul to dinner at  Olde Ebbitt Grill across from the Whitehouse.  Paul ordered a steak that we all agreed was the best steak any of us had ever tasted. I decided to attempt to recreate the recipe.  After thourally questioning our waiter and doing a little research and testing the recipe my family agrees that I have nailed it.  This recipe is now our ultimate all time favorite way to eat steak. View full post »

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This has been the most out of the ordinary winter with 65° temps in February. On this particular cloudy morning I have a little extra time so I’m attempting to make breakfast a bit out of the ordinary too.  In the hustle and caios of school day mornings it’s easy to forget how easy baked eggs are to make. I’ve been trying to step up breakfast to a more whole food level. It’s been ages since I’ve purchased a box of cereal.  Sadly the kids usually end up with oatmeal or a hard boiled egg and banana on the run.  Today will be much better.

You don’t need fancy dishes or special equipment. You can make baked eggs in muffin tins or even a pie plate. Today I made them in individual soup pots but you can make several servings in one shallow dish. Today I used ingredients I had in the refrigerator. Puff pastry, brie and prosciutto left over from a weekend charcuterie board, a bit of fresh pesto and of course fresh eggs. It’s really just a step up from eggs with ham and cheese. Prosciutto is a cured ham that has a salty, sweet flavor with a melt in your mouth texture.  

Don’t stop there! The beauty of baked eggs is the unlimited list of delicious ingredient options. View full post »

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What is your favorite cookie, the one you just have no power to resist? Chocolate Dipped Coconut Macaroons have become my weakness. I first tasted this cookie at the home of my friend Allison.  She made a batch for our visit and at first bite I was hooked. Allison graciously shared her recipe and they have been my go to cookie ever since.  Recently I took a plate of them to a dinner party and they were a huge hit. I made a large platter.  I often over bake!?  Happily, guests took some home.  The next day, my friends were chatting in a group text about rationing the remaining bits of their cookies because they so enjoyed them.  I’m constantly asked for this recipe. So, here you go friends… the recipe you have all asked for.  

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  • Kevin Horcher - If the cookies we bake using this recipe are only half as good as the one’s Sally made and brought to our house, we will be ecstatic! And yes, I have never really enjoyed coconut either, until tasting these truly delicious macaroons. Thanks for sharing the recipe.ReplyCancel

    • admin - You are so welcome my dear friend!ReplyCancel

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Many years ago my Mom added a New Orleans gumbo to the daily lunch menu in her restaurant. Since then, it’s been a popular dish that people line up for.  She gave me the recipe years ago but honestly, (true confession) I’ve never made it.  This week I decided to give it a try.  Mardi Gras is right around the corner and this is the perfect dish for the celebration. Her recipe includes chicken but does not include shrimp. Of course I had to change it up just a bit.  I wanted to add shrimp and I lightened the seasonings a bit for my gang that like things on the mild side.

I was curious about what the difference was between étouffée and gumbo.  What I found was that gumbo is a mix of vegetables and meat or shellfish with thickened stock. It’s traditionally served as a soup alongside rice that’s cooked separately. Unlike gumbo, which is considered a soup because of it’s thinner consistency. Étouffée’s a main course, made of one type of shellfish (crawfish or shrimp, for instance) that’s been smothered in a thick sauce and sometimes served ladled over rice.

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